HOT PEPPERS

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Don’t be afraid: embrace the hot pepper! They have great health benefits and add wonderful zing and complexity to a lof of different ethnic dishes.

STORAGE TIPS

Hot peppers store best in the fridge or even on the counter. Certain hot peppers (like cayennes or habaneros) can be dried by putting them in a dehydrator or in the oven (at about 120-130°F for a really long time (checking/turning every hour). You can also string them up and hang in a dry place in your kitchen or pantry.

RECIPES

Asian Peanut Noodle Salad
Chicken in Chile Verde
Chiles Rellenos
Fish Tacos w/Red Cabbage & Cilantro
Grilled Tomato, Corn & Poblano Salsa
Pico de Gallo
Red Pepper & Mint Sauce
Refrigerator Dilly Beans
Roasted Salsa on the Grill
Sauteed Broccoli and Kale
Southwestern Skillet
Spicy Southwest Red Cabbage Salad
Sri Lankan Mixed Pickle
Sweet Potato Chili
Thai Coconut Vegetable Soup
Tom’s Cucumber Salsa

 

Cooking & Eating Tips

Be sure to wear gloves when working with these peppers!

The hot peppers we grow:

Banana (vary from mild to hot): These are a fun surprise – are they hot or mild?  I like to cut off the tip & taste it before chopping it up for a dish, so you know which it is.  Either way, they’re great in sauces, stir fries, salsa, pizza, tacos, eggs

Cayenne (pretty damn hot): Great for drying or using (sparingly) in Thai dishes.

Habanero (ultra hot): we don’t really give these out in boxes, but rather as a “bonus item” sometimes. They are not for the faint at heart, but if you like it hot – these are the peppers for you.

Jalapeno (hot): Use to add fresh grassy zing & heat to dips, dressings, salsas & sauces, stir-fries, eggs, marinades, etc.  Store on the counter for up to a week & in plastic in the fridge for a bit longer.

Poblano (medium): This is one of our favorite peppers to grow.  They’re the classic Mexican pepper for stuffing in chiles rellenos, but they’re also delicious in fajitas, eggs, sauces & salsas.  Hotness in them is totally random – taste a little piece before adding them to a dish.  Store on the counter for a couple days or the fridge for longer.  Roasting REALLY brings out their amazing flavor – set whole ones directly over flames on a gas range or a grill, or right under the broiler until charred, then put in a bowl with a lid & let steam for a few minutes.  Rub off skin under running water, remove stem & seeds, & use as you would a spicy roasted red pepper (you might want to use gloves for this if you don’t want your hands to burn!).  You can freeze them at this point as well.